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  1. #1

    aggressive behavior when eating her food

    We have a black lab mix which is 7 months old now and she has become aggressive when eating her food. We will come close to her or bump her by accident and she starts to growl menacingly. I have been pulling her away with her leash and making her sit and cool down and then feeding her the rest of her meal. Don't know if I should be doing this. It happened today and she started barring her teeth and jumping for me, luckily I had her on a leash. She went directly to her kennel. I am afraid that this is a bite waiting to happen. Please send advice as soon as you can. Thanks. Beth R. :(

  2. #2
    ITs a tough thing when you are faced with this. My first advice is to feed her in her crate or somewhere undisturbed. This will prevent the growling. Meanwhile I would find a qualified trainer (try the dogtrainersearch.com) to help you through the issue. If you can't find a trainer who uses positive methods to help you try purchasing Jean Donaldsons book "Mine". It is excellent.

    Amy Dunphy, CPDT

  3. #3
    I have several suggestions:

    1) get into puppy training class. Immediately

    2) if this puppy is not altered, do so immediately. This is not typical or correct behavior for a lab puppy, and this should never be passed on.

    3) No more eating from a bowl for her for 7 days. Hand feed only.

    YOU hold the bowl, feed her hand full by hand full, and she must sit or obey some command for each handfull.

    4) at the end of a week, put the bowl on the floor, and put her food in hand full by hand full. Wait until she is finished with each handful you have put in, and is looking up at you, before you put more in the bowl.

    Feed this way for 2 days.

    at the end of THESE 2 days, put her food in the bowl, and have some REALLY tasty treats handy. Put her bowl down, and at least 4 times during her meal, walk past the bowl and drop something tasty in. If you can get her attention from eating, show her the treat, and ask her to come away from the bowl to get it.

    MOst dogs desensitised this way learn that their food is not threatened and they can eat in peace.

    Feeding inside a crate is also good advice.

    This puppy needs leadership training immediately, which why I recommended class.

    Please see my puppy training article at

    http://www.animalforum.com/dpuppy101.htm

    I would also recommend you visit this website,

    http://www.chowwelfare.com/cciw/alpha.htm

    print out this information, and go by it religiously, or at least until you get finish one series of training classes.

    Good luck. :D
    Redyre Rottweilers
    "Penny" U-CH Eternal Moon Finders Keepers
    "Didds", TT * "V-"PeeWee" BH AD IPO 1 TT
    Waiting at the Bridge...
    V-Roxy CD, ASCA CD, TT, TDI, HIC, CGC
    Best in Vet Sweeps, ARC Reg. IV Specialty, 9/01

  4. #4
    Welcome back Red.
    GREAT to see you here again.

  5. #5
    Wow that is crazy... he is your dog and he's acting like that? Man that's weird.

    If my male dog acted like that I would kick his ass!

    I think your dog either wasn't raised right or has some genetic aggressiveness or something... Maybe neutering will help but I have heard it doesn't always stop a dog from being aggressive.

  6. #6
    Hi,

    Just had to respond to Hellbore.

    >Wow that is crazy... he is your dog and he's acting like that? Man that's >weird.

    No, it's NOT crazy or wierd! It is NATURAL dog behaviour! Not desireable of course, and with careful breeding, these type behaviours are LESSENED, but not completely eradicated.

    >If my male dog acted like that I would kick his ass!

    It is often this type of confrontational behaviour that can cause a threat from a pet to become an actual attack! In this situation, for eg, the dog is guarding his food because he perceives the human to be a threat. If you kick his ass, you're PROVING HIM RIGHT! Depending on the dog, this could make the problem go away, but it can often cause it to get worse, as the dog now has a REAL threat to defend himself from.

    Violence begets violence, no matter what species we're on about! Try learning to understand the dog's behaviour, before changing it by teaching something else, rather than resorting to punishment.

    >I think your dog either wasn't raised right or has some genetic >aggressiveness or something... Maybe neutering will help but I have >heard it doesn't always stop a dog from being aggressive.

    ALL dogs have 'genetic aggressiveness'. It is part of being a dog. As said, it can be lessened with careful breeding & I too would get the dog fixed so this behaviour wouldn't be passed on. However, neutering to fix a problem such as this? Would you feel less threatened by a theif or a thug approaching you if you got fixed??

  7. #7

 

 

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