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  1. #1

    Should I Keep In House?

    Hello,
    My name is Taylor and I live in rural Mid-Michigan. The other day we stopped at our neighbor's house down the road, and he told us about this cat that was dropped off at his farm. He's a really really tame, solid smokey gray cat with some white on his chest and underbelly. You can also see some slight lighter colored bars on his body, but not very prominently. He has gorgeous green eyes to top it off.

    Anyway, the neighbor said that he was trying to find a home for the cat and he was almost positive that it was a house cat, because it always wanted to run into the house when he opened the door, plus, like I said, he is extremely tame. We took this cat home just planning on putting him into the garage for a few days until he settled down and then placing him in the barn with our barn cats, since we don't have any tame cats around the farm. Well...this cat is too darn cute, so he made his way to the backroom and now he's in the house! He is litter trained, that's for sure. As soon as he entered the house for the 1st time, he immediately ran around each of the rooms meowing, so I figured that he must be looking for a littler box. We don't have one, so I placed a very shallow, wide box in the garage with some floor dry. He immediately jumped right in and did #1 and #2 both. That's what makes me strongly believe he was a house cat and/or is litter trained--since he held it in that whole time when he just as easily could have went on the backroom floor.

    This is honestly probably one of the tamest, friendliest cats I've ever encountered, and he follows me around the house like a dog constantly purring and hugging my legs and such. However, I have 2 problems. He's a tom cat AND he's not declawed. The claws don't seem to be an issue...even though it's only been 1 day. He does 'pulsate' his paws a bit when he's purring, but it doesn't seem destructive at all.

    I have some questions that I would LOVE to have answered by someone with experience. I have never kept a cat in the house before:

    Does a cat have to be neutered to be in the house?
    Is a clawed cat in the house apt to be a very big issue?

    Thank you VERY much in advance for your reply. It means a lot to me.
    ~Taylor~

  2. #2
    id strongly suggest have him neutered--why wouldnt you do it anyway?

    and please dont have him declawed. i think that's animal cruetly. their claws are all they have to protect themselves from danger.

  3. #3
    OK First. Yes have him neutered. However if he's already spraying he may still continue to do that after the neuter. Have it done anyway so there's no unwanted babies made. But whether he continues to spray or not will be the deciding factor on whether he's suitable for your home. Trust me I've had a spraying cat indoors before and it's almost impossible to get that smell out.

    Second, Do NOT have him declawed. As another poster mentioned it's considered abuse by some. They need their claws to defend themselves. Even if you plan on keeping him indoors for the rest of his life things happen and if he happens to get outside he will need those claws to protect his life.

    Now, if you want to protect yourself and your furniture I'd suggest soft claws. They are caps you can get to put over the claws.

    Here are what they look like

    And if your not into the blue you can get many colors as well as clear caps.
    Hope this helps.
    Blessed Be

    Salem Witch Child

  4. #4
    Okay, sorry about that guys. I didn't know it was considered cruel, but I can see how it would be. I didn't realize the surgery was painful either.

    About how long would those caps stay on the nails? That sounds like a GREAT idea if they stay on!

    Thanks so much for the replies. :-)
    ~Taylor~

  5. #5
    Actually, I have a question about the caps, as well. How do they work, exactly? I ask because it's not like a cat's claws are unsheathed all the time. Do the caps fall off or do they keep the claws unsheathed at all times? Are cats comfortable in them? Can they be pulled off by them?

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by taylorhedrich
    Okay, sorry about that guys. I didn't know it was considered cruel, but I can see how it would be. I didn't realize the surgery was painful either.

    About how long would those caps stay on the nails? That sounds like a GREAT idea if they stay on!

    Thanks so much for the replies. :-)
    ~Taylor~
    The caps stay on for about a month. When you first use them it may be a little less. The more you use them the longer they will stay on. The cats may feel awkward with them at first and try to pull at them. When you first put them on it's almost like putting fake nails on yourself. You trim the nail back. Then you insert glue into the cap. Then slid it on and hold for a minute. Make sure for 5 minutes the cat does not get the chance to pull at it. My pack came with 40 caps in there. So it will last awhile. And cost me about $12.00 on Jeffers.com

    As the cat's nails grow the cap will fall off. You simply trim and reapply a new cap.



    Actually, I have a question about the caps, as well. How do they work, exactly? I ask because it's not like a cat's claws are unsheathed all the time. Do the caps fall off or do they keep the claws unsheathed at all times? Are cats comfortable in them? Can they be pulled off by them?
    Puff no longer bothers the caps. He did at first and I simply discouraged him from messing with it. He did get one cap off. But I may not have had enough glue either. This was my first time applying them too. In the month I've had it on him he's only pulled on one and got it off successfully. Oh and he can still climb his cat tree too. But it doesn't hurt if he tries to claw us or shred our furniture.

    As far as sheathed yes it does make them stay out of the sheath. He doesn't seem to mind though.
    Blessed Be

    Salem Witch Child

  7. #7
    Just one question, are you sure he was dropped off? Have you all posted that you found the cat in yourarea, because if hes a house cat there is always a chance that he is someones pet that may have some how slipped out their door on them and got himself lost. I don't know too many people who put in the time and effort to train and have a full blown house cat then just abandon it, normally that only happens with cats who the owners didn't bother to train.

    Definatly nuter, other wise you may end up with tons more problems when cats near by go into heat. As for the declawing, most people do see it as abuse, and very few vets will willingly do the proceedure anymore not without some sort of garentee that the cat will never be outside and they will only do the front feet even then. At least around here anyway. Our vet wont declaw, and wont dock tails either, seems more and more vets are weeding out unnessisary proceedures like those.
    The reason dogs are great is they wag their tails, not their tongues.

  8. #8
    I'll go ahead and add my $.02 as well.

    Yes you can keep cats in the house without any problems, I have 3 cats and they are all strictly indoor kitties at the moment. We moved from a semi-rural area to long island so for their safety they are now indoor only. It causes no problems at all.

    I would recommend getting the cat neutered, it just solves a lot of problems. From fighting to spraying to yowling to attract a mate in the middle of the night. They will also stick around a lot closer to home.

    That pulsing is called kneading, its basically the cat remembering its kittenhood when it was safe and warm with mommacat. Your mileage will vary with different tactics. I've never tried the softcaps but they look to be a great idea. The other option is to put a towel on your lap and add that extra layer of cloth to protect your legs.

    Scratching furniture is not usually a problem if they have something to scratch, mine like their scratching posts throughout my apartment.

    I personally would suggest the cat stay indoors, the barn cats will try to drive it away. Cats are very territorial critters.
    Everything not nailed down is a cat toy, everything else is a scratching post.

  9. #9
    I'd definantly say go for the neuter.

    The declaw is a no-go. Since there are softpaws (if you dont want to order from their website, check out the deals on eBay, thats where I buy mine) therre isnt a reason to declaw.

    The last softpaws I bought for my cat were green and red, around Christmas. ;)

    I only use them on one of my two cats, because Simon is a cat who uses his hands quite a bit to "see" things, I suppose. I could never have him declawed, IMO, because he is somewhat disabled, and if he were ever to get outside he'd need all the defence he could muster.

    Argueable, I know, but my other cat, Sam is an indoor/outdoor (neutered) cat. He is a holy terror in the houose at times, but perfectly content to lay sunning on the porch or deck. He stays close and has a recall better than some of my dogs.

    Because I allow him in and out there is no way on earth I'd consider having him declawed. I know the risk he is at as it is, by being allowed outside - and I don't want to compound it by taking some of his defense away.

 

 

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