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Thread: D-Con and cats

  1. #1

    D-Con and cats

    I'm wondering if D-con will hurt a cat? Will they even eat the stuff??

    I have a major mouse problem right now and my cats are catching mice left and right but there is one sneaky little rodent that keeps getting by everyone.

    I don't want to use glue traps cause.......eww....... I don't want to use mice traps cause ewwww and I have a dumb dog who would probably try to eat the cheese himself. So that pretty much leaves D-con but my cats have free roam of 100% of the house. The livingroom closet is under the stairs so even with the door shut they can still get into the closet. The hall closet is more like a built in shelf so there's no door on it. And the kid's bedroom closet they have a tendency to leave the door open so the cats come in and out of there. And the cats play under the cupboards in the kitchen. So there isn't any place I can really hide dcon. So will it hurt them?

  2. #2
    I hope this helps: http://pmep.cce.cornell.edu/profiles...-warfarin.html

    Here's one part of it if you don't want to scroll through the basic info:

    TOXICOLOGY

    A. ACUTE TOXICITY

    ORAL: LD50 = 3 mg/kg (rat) (56).
    LD50 = 186 mg/kg. A single large dosage is about
    as toxic as a single small dose. On a multiple
    dose basis the LD100 is .2 mg/kg/day for 5 days to
    rats (8c). Death followed 5 daily doses of: 3
    mg/kg for cats; 1 mg/kg for pigs, poultry are more
    resistant (62).

    EYES: Warfarin is not known to be an eye irritant. It
    has produced hemorrhages in the retina, however,
    through its sytemic toxicity (Grant) (14).

    (also this part:)

    VIII. PROTECTIVE MEASURES

    STORAGE AND HANDLING: Keep away from children, domestic animals, pets,
    or wildlife. Do not store near feeds and foodstuffs. Avoid contact
    with mouth, eyes, skin. Store away from heat and open flame (56).


    It sounds like it is harmful. I don't know if your cat would eat it. It says it's odorless, so I'm not sure if your cats would even be attracted to it unless it's simple curiousity because it came across their path. Though, I don't think you should try it.

  3. #3
    Thanks for that info. I think I've found a way to make sure the mice get it but the cats don't. I've seen a few places the mice go into (like I have a large crack between the window and frame that one went into.) So maybe I can dump a little in these places that the mice can get to but the cats can't.

    I had a pet rabbit eat dcon once. And she ate a ton of it, atleast 1/4 the box. She was probably 2 months old at the time. I called the vet, almost crying and he said there was nothing he can do and prepare for the worst. I ended up POURING milk down her throat with a dropper. I figured, if it was a child who ate it they'd say to drink milk so why not try this right? hehe Anyway. She ended up living, no problems. Had two miraculous litters (I say that because she was a female, in her own hutch and was actually the ONLY rabbit we owned--her hutch stood 4 feet off the ground too). It was wild.

    Anyway.....thanks again!

  4. #4
    Wow, that's very fortunate, and a good idea for a cure. I'm glad it worked out and hopefully no problems come across this time around. C=

  5. #5
    As a young child I lost a cat that had caught and eaten a poisoned mouse. The cat died from secondary poisoning. Each cat is different as to what they can tolerate in their systems. You are taking huge risks leaving poisons of any type out with kids and pets in the house, plus it is another huge risk assuming that a poisoned mouse that is caught and eaten by one of your cats will not make your cat ill or potentially kill your cat. Those risks are really too much to take and you want the best and safest method for your kids and your pets. If your pets or kids get sick from the poison, you'll be shelling out bucks to a doctor and kicking yourself for not being more careful with the poisons. Get the mouse traps and set them in the unusual areas and the mice will find them. That way you do not risk the health of your kids or your pets.

    The other downside of poisoning mice or rats is that people will tell you they get into wierd hard to reach areas of your home and die and the stench will be so bad that you will be kicking yourself for poisoning them and not using the mouse traps. You can find yourself hiring a crew to discover where the stench is coming from and cleaning it out, which can run into a lot of money--it's not worth it. With mice, you have to get tough and use the traps to protect your kids and pets, and to make sure you don't have a mouse die in some strange area of your home because you'll REALLY regret it.

    Then you have to figure out where the mice are coming in. You have to plug all the holes and stop them. Mice, or the parasites they carry (fleas, mites and worms) can carry disase, including lyme disease and the Hanta virus. So it is important to locate the entry areas and close them, and disinfect all inside your home, your kitchen countertop, your dishes, throw away cat/dog food that is left out and begin putting their food away at night, and disfect cat/dog dishes. A half cup of bleach in a sinkful of dishwashing soapy water will kill bacteria and such on dishes for humand and pets and use that water to clean your kitchen countertops and your stove and microwave and appliances the mice may have been walking over. I picked up the bleach washing solution from a hospital employee years ago that worked in the kitchen and they were required to use it.

    Good luck.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Ragdoll Mom
    As a young child I lost a cat that had caught and eaten a poisoned mouse. The cat died from secondary poisoning.
    I have asked MANY vets in different states about this and they all say that a cat (or other animal) canNOT die or get secondary poisoning from eating a poisoned mouse because the dcon will not kill the mouse until it's been digested and broken down, which happens very quickly. So in order to have any ill effect on another animal it would have to be eaten within minutes after injesting the poison. They say a mouse's stomach is so small that it doesn't take much for them to die. They usually only eat five to ten of the dcon pellets before they start to feel ill and stop eating it and die within 10 minutes of eating it. And this amount is not enough or strong enough to kill a larger animal (such as a cat). This is also why "they" say not to put dcon right at the entrance of where the mice enter/exit the walls. The farther away from the hole it is, they will die before they get back.

    And as far as stench goes, that's not true. A decomposing mouse will smell for only a few days at the most and because they are so small it won't be an unbearable smell that would require you to hire someone to come find it. By the time they got to your house to search, the mouse would be bone and there'd be no smell left. However, there would be a housefull of flies which is also why the smell wouldn't last. Flies hatch quickly and will eat the mouse almost in its entirety over night.

    I've done a lot of research and have asked many vets and specialists about this. But I've still decided not to use the dcon afterall. It's just one mouse (I know where there's one, there's usually more) but I've only seen one and he seems to leave me alone. The cats and dogs are all current on everything and we do dewormers monthly so I'm not concerned with them catching anything. And with how often pest control is out here for fleas, I'm sure even my mouse is flea-free. LOL (I can hope anyway).

  7. #7
    I'm glad you decided against using D-Con. The vets you talked to put a lot of contingency into a mouse dying that cats don't abide by and if you pinned them down further they would probably back off saying a cat would "never" die as there is no control as to what stage a cat would eat a mouse that would have ingested D-Con. That's something a vet has no control over.

    As to a mouse dying, I worked at an office in 2003 and the office had closed down for vacation. We returned and the office had a terrible stench. A mouse had died in our supply room from poison in the building and it had some watery fluid all around it. It smelled so bad that the building maintenance had to be called to clean it all up, air out the office and disinfect the supply room. Everyone was told to take a break and went to the coffee shop on the lower level as the smell was really putrid. So yes, a dead mouse can really smell big time and it is a sickening smell.

  8. #8
    JADL,

    I think Ragdoll Mom is being extremely polite in her responses to you.

    Mine would have been more like: CAN'T YOU READ????

    The info on the D Con package tells you that secondary poisoning can occure and IT OFTEN DOES.

    I can't believe you would state that a veterinarian (or multiple ones that you have contacted) deny this fact.

    Re: the 'one' mouse you see - there are probably hundreds and you are not seeing the same one every time.

    You can buy humane 'multiple catch' live traps which will not cause harm to either the mice or your cats or your dogs but that takes some effort on your part and it would probably cut into your computer time.

    Your posts do irritate me specifically because they upset the other posters and cause them to spend their valuable time talking 'nicely' to you to explain things that are self evident. Try researching your questions before you post them here. There are many good search engines - google and goodsearch are just two which would have answered your questions about D Con - IF after doing that you had questions about that info then you could post them here. But in this case you didn't bother to do that - just threw a 'terrifying' question out to animal lovers that gave them cause for concern. Why on earth would you do something like that time and time again?

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by petsalive

    I think Ragdoll Mom is being extremely polite in her responses to you.
    I agree and I'd much rather talk to her than you.


    Quote Originally Posted by petsalive
    The info on the D Con package tells you that secondary poisoning can occure and IT OFTEN DOES.
    I looked through several websites and dcon packages and websites and never once did it say, "don't let your cat eat a mouse that has eaten dcon"

    Quote Originally Posted by petsalive
    I can't believe you would state that a veterinarian (or multiple ones that you have contacted) deny this fact.
    Isn't this forum about sharing experience? I'm sharing what I've been told over the last few days.

    Quote Originally Posted by petsalive
    Re: the 'one' mouse you see - there are probably hundreds and you are not seeing the same one every time.
    I can answer that with your own answer.......CAN'T YOU READ?? I said I knew where there's one there's always more.

    Quote Originally Posted by petsalive
    You can buy humane 'multiple catch' live traps which will not cause harm to either the mice or your cats or your dogs but that takes some effort on your part and it would probably cut into your computer time..
    What the heck would I want live traps for? What am I going to do with it then? Sqush it? Bang it on the head? Stomp on it? Feed it to the cat? Put it in a glass jar with no air vents and hope it eventually sufficates? Gross. I don't want them in my house but I'm not the least bit interested in having to chop its head off!!

  10. #10
    I had to drop my cat off at the vets this morning and talked to my vet briefly about D-Con. She's an excellent vet and won't mince words. She said she would never trust it near pets or children. She said don't gamble with poison, your family and your pets. She suggested that instead concentrate on fixing your home to close the entrances the mice population are using. I think that is the best advice of all.

    As an aside, some people do trap mice live and then release them far away in a wild open field where they are not near homes or businesses. The people that do not believe in killing trapped mice find this to be a humane solution (and a non-toxic one) to ridding mice from their home. I find nothing wrong with this and again, it is another good solution to ridding one's home of mice.

    So what I can leave you with is this. You came here asking a question and then said I have asked MANY vets in different states about this and you had answers from them. We on this site are not vets and since you already have answers from those many vets in different states, you don't need our answers. I always defer to vets and I always defer to my vet on choices with my cats. So go with your vets and that should end this.

 

 

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